Homework Tips for Parents

As the new school year is fully underway, most students are returning home with daily homework assignments. To avoid a fight over this work, we’ve compiled the following tips:

How much homework is too much?

The National Education Association recommends that students in first grade receive around 10-20 minutes of homework per night. This amount should grow by 10 minutes per year, which means that students in fifth grade should expect to receive around 50-60 minutes of homework per night. This estimate can vary more widely in middle school and high school as students take on different coursework, but if your child is taking on significantly more than is recommended or is having trouble completing it all, talk to other parents in the school. Are they encountering the same issue? If so, consider talking to your child’s teacher to see if he or she is aware of the issue. If your child is the exception, he or she may benefit from extra tutoring or an extra study period where your child can receive additional assistance through the school.

Organization is key

Leaving large projects for the last minute or forgetting about them entirely can be a huge issue for some students. Encourage your child to use an assignment book to track the due dates of projects and check in on a regular basis to see what progress they’re making. Free online tools, such as Asana can be used to break down larger projects into smaller tasks and assign due dates to each piece. It can even be used to coordinate group projects, where students each have their own account and individual tasks assigned to them. It also includes a conversation feature where students can brainstorm, upload files, and communicate with each other.

Create an environment conducive to getting homework done

One of the problems many students report that prevents them completing homework is a distracting environment. To help students focus on their homework, create a well-lit, quiet space away from distractions such as talking, TV, or cellphones. If students must use a computer for their work, consider limiting their access to the internet or certain websites so they aren’t tempted to spend their time chatting with their friends or checking social media. Programs such as Cold Turkey easily and temporarily limit these distractions by blocking specific websites, the internet in general, or even the entire computer.

Keep in contact with your child’s teacher

By regularly communicating with your child’s teacher, it’s much easier to find out if your child is missing assignments or struggling with particular concepts. Plus, if your child needs assistance, it’s helpful to teach it in the same way it’s taught in the classroom. Parents often report that they don’t understand their child’s homework or that concepts are being taught in unfamiliar ways. Avoid re-teaching concepts in a different way, even if it seems like a shortcut (particularly for math). Your child’s teacher is likely trying to teach the underlying concept before introducing shortcuts or different strategies.